8 tips on how to save money in Australia : Advice for expats

If you’re like me, you love good deals and saving your funds. Here are my money-saving tips for Australia:
1. Get an Entertainment Book. Every April, companies and charitable organizations sell these books to raise money for their causes. For AUD 65 you can get a book for your city and I assure you that if you go out to restaurants, movies and other forms of entertainment anyway, or if you travel within the country, the book will more than pay for itself. You’ll receive a gold Entertainment Card to use for discounts (usually 25 per cent) in fine dining establishments, and vouchers for discounts (usually 25 per cent or two-for-one) at cafes, bistros, casual and fast food restaurants as well as coffee shops and takeaway outlets. The book also contains vouchers for everything from the ballet to sporting events to movie tickets to zoos and tourist attractions. You’ll also get corporate-type discounts on hotels and car rentals and discounts on magazines, nationwide florists and many other products and services.

2. Shop during the sales. While you will find mid-season retail sales, especially when the economy isn’t doing very well, most of the sales occur twice a year: after the Christmas holidays and just before the end of the financial year.

3. Sign up for your favourite stores’ rewards cards. Many of the large nationwide retail chains have their own loyalty rewards programs. These generally allow you to accumulate points for your spending and earn store gift cards, merchandise and/or other privileges. Two popular programs are FlyBuys and MyerOne. You can f ind credit cards with rewards programs with Reward Program Credit Card finder.

4. Don’t forget about your favourite overseas retailers online. It can often be cheaper to purchase items like books and cosmetics online, despite the shipping fees. I still place orders from Amazon.com and I also order beauty products from a company called StrawberryNet. If your favourite overseas retailer doesn’t ship internationally but they will take your overseas credit card, you can use a service like vPost to have your goods shipped to a US, UK or Japan address and then forwarded to your address in Australia. Two other services to consider are comGateway and borderlinx.

5. Look for savings days. Movie theatres usually have one day a week when ticket prices are significantly reduced. Pubs often have lunch and dinner specials depending on the day of the week. Keep an eye out for these kinds of deals at the places you frequent and take advantage of them.

6. Shop around. This tactic works anywhere in the world and it applies to everything from interest and mortgage rates to appliances. Get into the habit of enquiring with at least three vendors before you make a purchase. You can usually use competitors’ prices to negotiate deals with other suppliers. You can find the major retailers’ catalogues on Lasoo.

7. Cut down on little extras. Pack your lunch when you go to work instead of buying it. Use the library. Take tea and coffee to work instead of buying it at the café. Turn lights off when you aren’t using them. Buy generic brands of sugar, flour and other basics. All these extra dollars add up.

8. Use eBay. Buy items at low prices and sell your unwanted stuff as well. Australia has its own site.

Check out FrugalAussies where around 300 Australian residents share their tips for saving money for more ideas.

Are you emigrating to Australia? Want to learn more about the financial aspects of your move?

Packed with helpful resources, anecdotes and advice, the Moving to Australia eBook is an excellent guide to those seeking information about migration to Australia. Whether you want to work in Australia long-term or just have a working holiday in Australia, this book will assist you with all aspects of your journey. All Australian visas are also outlined, such as skilled immigration visas, student visas and visas for those who have already found jobs in Australia.

Click here NOW to get the Moving to Australia eBook, the ultimate guide for expats in Australia.

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Do you want to study in Australia? A guide for overseas students

Australia is a great place to undertake study in one of thousands of subjects at Australian universities or train for a vocation. Australia has world class educational and student facilities and faculty. More than 320,368 student visas were granted in the 2008-09 program year, representing more than a 15 per cent growth in the student visa program in one year.

Choosing a program
Your desire to study may be fuelled by curiosity about a subject, an intended career change or to advance your professional career. If you do not already have a bachelor’s degree and you want to work towards that, you will want to look into undergraduate university programs. This is the most common type of degree found in Australia. You will need it to get most of the better paying jobs as the job market here is very competitive. If university is not an option for you, or if your career ambitions are better serviced by a more practical qualification, you should look into one of the public Technical and Further Education (TAFE) Institutes. You can also undertake vocational training at private colleges, schools and universities. TAFE qualifications may also be applied as credit to a degree program should you decide to pursue a bachelor’s degree later on.

If you already have a bachelor’s degree and are looking to advance in your chosen profession, gain additional training or make a career change, then you’ll want to look into postgraduate study. You can work towards a graduate certificate, graduate diploma, master’s degree or doctoral degree (PhD). Whatever you choose, you will need to begin to think about what you want to achieve through your study and begin looking into schools and courses that will lead to your desired outcome. Education after high school is usually completed at an accredited university or training program and you will need to apply directly to the school you are interested in. If you are not a permanent resident, you will have to apply as an overseas student and you’ll be required to pay overseas student fees.

Resources
Australian government website for international students

Going to Uni
The complete guide to studying for permanent residents and citizens of Australia; this is a step-by-step resource for all aspects of studying

The Good Universities Guide
An online resource for education, training and career pathways where you can find information about every degree and university in Australia along with performance ratings

Study Abroad Australia
This is a comprehensive directory of study programs aimed towards students coming from overseas.

Worldwide Classroom: Consortium for International Education and Multicultural Studies
This site features a directory and information on over 10,000 primary, secondary, language schools and universities in 95 countries, including Australia.

Student visas in Australia

If you are interested in studying in Australia, there are a number of visa options for you. Part of your visa application will involve an objective measure of immigration risk for each of 190 different countries called ‘assessment levels.’ These determine visa requirements. There are five assessment levels in the student visa program, with Level 1 representing the lowest immigration risk and Level 5 the highest. The higher the assessment level, the more evidence you will be required to submit to demonstrate support of your claims made in the application. These levels are determined by each student group’s compliance with their visa conditions and other indicators in the previous year. Levels are raised and lowered based on these factors. So the behaviour of your country’s student group from last year will affect your visa requirements this year.

The number of combinations of visa types and assessment levels makes describing them all here prohibitive. Your first port of call should be the Overseas Student Program – Assessment Levels information sheet found here. Australia offers student visas for programs from English Language Intensive Courses for Overseas Students (ELICOS) to primary and secondary courses to vocational and sponsored training to university study at all levels. You should first think about what you might want to study and then proceed to determining your eligibility and choosing the visa that most closely matches your needs. Your family members may be eligible to apply for a visa to accompany you to Australia while you study and they are subject to the same assessment level as you are, regardless of the passport they hold. You may also be eligible to work during your studies with certain restrictions. To learn more about the visas available for study in Australia, visit the Department of Immigration and Citizenship’s website here.

Are you interested in living to Australia? Do you want to know more about studying in Australia? Packed with helpful resources, anecdotes and advice, the Moving to Australia eBook is an excellent guide to those seeking information about migration to Australia as a student. Whether you want to attend university in Australia or just complete a semester abroad here, this book will assist you with all aspects from applying to finding a place to live in Australia and resources for your life here. All Australian visas are also outlined, such as skilled immigration visas, working holiday visas and visas for those who want to remain in Australia after their studies.

Click here NOW to get the Moving to Australia eBook, the ultimate guide for expats in Australia.

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Migrating to Australia: Leaving friends and family behind

The decision to become an expat is a difficult one. Migrating overseas, especially if you are moving as far away as Australia, will require a lot of adjustment for both you, your family and those you leave behind. If you have lived in the same place for many years and have a strong network of family and friends in your local area, many of them will probably be surprised, even shocked, at your decision to move. To some people facing such a loss of closeness to you, this may feel like an act of betrayal or at least rejection. Why would you want to leave us when we’re all having such a good time here?

If you’re relocating for an amazing job opportunity or a loved one, people are likely to be more understanding than if you’re just looking for a change or a new adventure. People may be happy for you and excited for a new place to visit. But be prepared for all kinds of responses and try not to take them too personally. People, especially those who have lived in one place their entire lives and can’t imagine ever leaving, will not understand your decision, may take it personally and may not make the same effort to keep in touch with you as you are willing to make for them. In life, people and situations change, and you will have to live with the consequences of your decision.

As with everything else in your move, it’s going to depend with your own personal set of circumstances, lifestyle and the people you call friends. I’ve found that the best way to deal with comments and reactions from people, good or bad, is to be honest, unapologetic and positive about your decision. We cannot make guarantees in this life that we will be around forever and moving is just another one of those things that happens. Reactions from people whose opinion you care about may make you think twice about your decision to relocate. You should not be afraid of this happening. It’s actually good to be faced with challenges when making such an important decision. But you should always consider the source and the context. You’d feel pretty sad if no one cared that you were going away, but don’t let people’s feelings and objections stand in the way of what you want for your life.

Some of your friends and family members may take it very personally that you are leaving. You should reassure them that you aren’t leaving to get away from them or because you are necessarily unhappy with your relationships or support network, but because [insert your reason] and your decision is not a reflection on them. Try to emphasize the positive aspects of your move. Reassure them that you will still keep in touch (if you will) and that you’ll visit them (if you will). With really close friends and family, it can help to make specific plans for when you will see them again. This forms a concrete impression in their minds that they are not losing you forever and that they will see you again soon.

Another situation I faced when I moved to Australia was the loss of friendships. Many of these friendships were with people I was very close to and always thought would be in my life. I find it is almost easier to keep in touch with the people with whom you had weaker ties. They don’t and won’t expect as much of a time commitment from you and this makes it easier to keep up friendly banter over email. The friends I lost were ones I was really close to, which is really devastating. We never had any major fights or confrontations about anything, but they just stopped responding to my emails and requests to arrange a time for me to call them, and after awhile I gave up. With the friends and family that I do still keep up with, it is very clear that I am the one who has to make the most effort to visit them, call them and write to them. My family are better at keeping in touch, as you would expect, but there is no way they are getting on a plane to come and visit us, even for important events.

I’m certainly not saying that this is going to happen to you. But I also don’t want to give you a false sense of security that you can just leave your home country and expect everything in your life to be maintained remotely via electronic communications. With Skype, which wasn’t as popular when I left the US as it is now, there’s really no excuse not to speak with people. But for some, it may just not be enough. Memories and friendships can fade if not nurtured and some people are more needy than others. Disagreements tend to intensify when long distances are involved. You won’t always be able to come back for weddings or to visit new babies. They may not be able to afford to come and visit you or even want to come to Australia in the first place. The only reassuring fact that I can share with you is that, in my experience, your true friends will still be there. I am still close to many of my good friends.

The bright side of all of this is that you’re going off on a new adventure. You’ll need to make room in your life for new people. The other thing that I have experience with is living in the past. I did this in the first couple of years I was away. I stayed in touch with my old friends at the expense of meeting new people and forming new relationships. I’d say I had an 80/20 ratio, where I was focussing eighty percent of my efforts on my old friends and twenty percent of my attention on my new home. Now it is more like 30/70. I still spend a third of my time keeping up with my old friends. But the vast majority of my life is spent in the present, enjoying the new relationships that I’ve formed, which also includes meeting new people and pursuing new opportunities. I still have professional interests back in the States and friends and family there that I still care about. But early on I recognised that if you’re ever going to have a chance at being happy in your new life, you need to let go of the past. After all, you made a decision to move to a new country for a reason. And you should embrace it.

Here are some sites to help you stay in touch:
Facebook

Skype
Voice over internet service allowing you to talk for free by using a headset from one computer to another and cheaply from a computer to a telephone; you can also use Skype for instant messaging

Geni
This is a great site for families, even older relatives who are online. It is a social networking site somewhat similar to Facebook, however it creates a family tree and is easy to use. Build your genealogy records while keeping in touch with relatives. You can share photos, messages, timelines of family history and more.
Are you interested in moving to and working in Australia? Do you want to know all about the process of relocating from someone who’s successfully done it?

Packed with helpful resources, anecdotes and advice, this eBook is an excellent guide to those seeking information about migration to Australia. Whether you want to work in Australia long-term or just have a working holiday in Australia, this book will assist you with all aspects of your journey. All Australian visas are outlined, such as skilled immigration visas, student visas and visas for those who have already found jobs in Australia. ‘Moving to Australia’ covers everything from packing up your current home to finances to health cover to meeting people in Australia. It is a guide to making a successful transition to living in Australia. Whether you’re planning a permanent move to Australia or just a short-term relocation, this book will help you figure it all out.

Click here NOW to get the Moving to Australia eBook, the ultimate guide for expats in Australia.

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How to find a place to live in Australia :: Advice for new migrants

If you’re a new migrant to Australia, you’re probably looking for a flat or house to live in. Most capital cities have competitive rental and housing markets and it can take some time to find exactly what you’re looking for. If you are looking to purchase a home, you’ll be in for even more fun.

When choosing temporary accommodation for your first few weeks in Australia, try to select a place where you will be able to extend your time easily if you need to. It could take you a month or more to find a rental and you should be prepared for this. If you are coming to work on an employer sponsored migration visa, ask your company to help you choose an executive rental. Most companies are happy to help their employees with temporary housing when they are moving to a new country and some even have special apartments that they own for this purpose.

If you are a single person, you might want to try shared housing, especially if you are young and want to meet new people right away. You’ll also save a lot of money doing this, as it can be expensive to live alone. If you want to go solo, you’ll need to find a property in a price range that property managers will deem your salary sufficient to afford (usually your rent must not be more than one-third of your salary). You may also encounter some private listings when you look through the newspapers or online. Renting a property through a private individual can be a more flexible experience than renting through a real estate agent. Each state has laws that govern professional agents and independent landlords equally, and you will be protected under the same rules and provided with the same rights and obligations as if you rent from a professional agent.

Each state has different laws and different governing bodies that enforce housing rules. You will be provided with the rules in your state once you sign a rental agreement. The most popular websites used to find properties for sale or rent are listed below. Properties are available for viewing either by appointment, at ‘open for inspection’ times or by picking up the keys from the leasing agent’s office (a deposit may be required and conditions will apply). Once you find a place that you’re interested in, you can ask for a residential tenancy application. The landlord or agent will ask for formal identification such as a driver’s license or passport, your employment details and references. You may also have to provide bank statements, birth certificates, a rental history and a mortgage statement from your last country of residence if applicable.

If you are successful in your application for a rental property, you will be asked to sign a standard tenancy agreement, which may include a supplementary annexure covering additional conditions you must agree to as a tenant. There are two types of tenancy agreements in Australia. The first type of agreement is a fixed-term agreement, which is set for a specific period of time (usually one year). The second type, a periodic or month-to-month agreement, goes from week-to-week or month-to-month. The primary differences between the two are the ability of the landlord to raise rent (usually only after the fixed term ends and only every six months for a periodic agreement) and the notice periods required for certain actions during the tenancy such as terminating the agreement. You usually must give a certain number of weeks’ notice before vacating your property at the end of a fixed-term agreement, even if the agreement ends on a specific date. Please check the details of your particular lease agreement if you have questions about anything.

Before you commence a rental tenancy, you will also be asked for a security bond, which is money to cover any damage to the property or loss of rent that the landlord may incur during your tenancy. Usually the amount of the bond is equal to one month’s rent, however, under certain circumstances, the landlord can ask for more than one month’s rent. The bond cannot be used towards any part of your rent. You will also be asked to provide one month’s rent in advance. Before you move in, you will fill out a condition report that notes any pre-existing damages or irregularities to the property prior to moving in. Be sure to keep a copy of this report so that you have evidence to show that you did not damage the property if there are any disputes about the bond at the end of the lease.

If you decide to purchase a property, know that it can take some time to transfer ownership of the property. ‘Settlement’ is when the exchange of money and property between the owner and the buyer (and the bank if the buyer is taking out a mortgage) takes place. So you will need to allow more time before you are able to move into a purchased property. The Foreign Investment Review Board (FIRB) must make a decision on any proposed purchases by non-citizens or non-permanent residents of Australia. These decisions can take thirty days. It can be cost prohibitive to purchase property in Australia due to the high cost of Stamp Duty, a non-refundable tax paid by buyers of properties. The tax is based on a percentage of the purchase price of your home so it can become very expensive if you are buying a pricey place to live. If the FIRB requires that you sell your home when you leave Australia, you may want to determine whether it is in your best financial interests to purchase a property for such a short amount of time. If you are planning to stay permanently, this becomes less of an issue.

You may wish to enlist the assistance of a buyer’s agent if you plan to purchase a property and would like help to get the best deal. You can find a list of reputable buyers’ agents through The Property Buyer’s Agents Association of Australia or Real Estate Buyers’ Agents Association of Australia. Your buyer will probably be able to start assisting you before you arrive in Australia.

Resources
Allhomes (listings)

Domain (listings)

Easy Roommate
Share accommodation and flatmates ads

Flatmates.com.au
Australia’s largest free website listing flatmates, share houses and shared accommodation in Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane

Gumtree ads
This link will take you to the Sydney listings, but you can just change city to go to your own local listings.

Hospitality Exchange
Free accommodation worldwide

Housemates.com.au
Free share accommodation ads with articles and noticeboards

Housepals

This is a British-based house and flat share website with listings in Australia.

Local Voices
Check out reviews from locals before you sign that lease.

RealEstate.com.au (listings)

Real Estate View (listings)

Sleeping With The Enemy
Short to medium term accommodation

Are you interested in moving to Australia? Do you want to know more about the relocation process, including how to purchase property in Australia? Packed with helpful resources, anecdotes and advice, the Moving to Australia eBook is an excellent guide to those seeking information about migration to Australia. Whether you want to work in Australia long-term or just have a working holiday in Australia, this book will assist you with all aspects of your journey. All Australian visas are also outlined, such as skilled immigration visas, student visas and visas for those who have already found jobs in Australia.

Click here NOW to get the Moving to Australia eBook, the ultimate guide for expats in Australia.

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Curious about cost of living in Australia? Prices for 100 common items

If you’re considering migration to Australia, a frequently asked question is about the cost of living in Australia. Listed below are the prices for common items found in the central business district or inner suburbs of Melbourne at the time of writing.* To calculate the cost in your local currency, use a free converter such as XE.

Air conditioner, 5.2KW Cooling, 6.2KW Heating – Fujitsu $1699.
Aluminium foil, 20 metre (m) x 30 cm roll – generic brand $3.66
Anti-perspirant (men’s), 78 grams (g) – Gillette Clear Gel $6.18
Apples, 1.5 kilograms (kg) – ‘Red Delicious’ from supermarket $4.95
Bananas, 1 kg – from market $1.99
BBQ grillJackeroo Burwood Roaster 4 Burner $169.
Beef mince, lean, 500 g – from supermarket $6.00
Beer, 375 mL bottle 24 pack – Crown Lager (local premium) $49.99
Big Mac (McDonald’s) $4.35
Blu-ray disc player – Toshiba $279.
Board gameMonopoly $39.95
Book, bestselling paperback $22.99
Boxer shorts (men’s), 3 pack $15.00
Bread, sliced loaf – Tip Top Sunblest Wholemeal, 650 g $3.79
Butter, slightly salted, 250 g – Lurpak $4.73
Camera, digital – Sony Cybershot 12.1 Megapixel, 3x Optical Zoom $149.
Candy barMars, 53 g $1.91
Car, new, base price – Nissan Maxima 2.5 250 ST-L xtronic CVT $33,990
Cereal, 775 g box – Kellogg’s Corn Flakes $6.19
Cheese, 750 g block – Bega Tasty $10.89
Clock radio/alarmSony with iPod dock $176.
Cola, 375 mL 24 pack cans – major name brand $24.84
Coffee, instant, 150 g – Nescafe Mild Roast $8.71
Coffee, small latte takeaway $3.25
ComputerDell Intel i3 w/ 18.5” Monitor 4GB RAM 500GB Hard Drive $999.
Concert ticket – int’l tour, popular act, best available seat $125
Condoms, 12 pack – Durex Natural Feel $7.12
Dishwashing liquid, 600 mL bottle – Palmolive Lemon $4.57
Doritos, bag, 200g $3.26
DVD rental, new release, overnight $6.00
Eggs, one dozen x-large cage – supermarket brand $2.50
Fertiliser, All Purpose garden – Brunnings NPK, 500g $2.61
Flour, plain, 1 kg – supermarket brand $2.61
Football game ticket, reserved seat $45
Formula, infant, Nestle Nan Pro Gold from 6mos Follow On, 900 g $25.69
Foxtel (cable TV), all channels Platinum iQ – monthly $120
Glass cleaner, Windex, 500 mL $4.24
Greeting card, regular size – Hallmark $4.99
GPS systemNavman MY50T $236.
Honey, Beechworth Honey Squeeze, 375g $5.22
Ice cream, Bulla Creamy Classics Vanilla, 2 L $7.50
iPhone 3G handset, 8 GB (does not include usage) $719.
iPod Classic, 160 GB $329.
Jam, strawberry conserve 500 g jar – Cottee’s $3.77
KettleSunbeam 2400 W cordless, 1.7L $44.95
Laundry soap, powder – Omo Small & Mighty, 1 kg $11.98
Light globe, mini spiral 18 watt edison screw – supermarket brand $10.88
Magazine, annual subscription – Good Health $54.95
Mascara, tube – L’Oreal Telescopic Explosion $26.95
Mattress, queen-sized – Sealy Spinecare Deluxe Ensemble $999.
Meat, deli roasted ham, 1 kg $15.50
Microwave oven, 1100W – Sharp Touch control $199.
Milk, reduced-fat, 2 L – supermarket brand $2.99
Motor oil, 1 L – Shell Helix Plus 15W-50 $14.70
Movie, Blu-ray new release $35
Movie, theatre ticket, one adult $17.50
Mustard, 215 g – Maille Dijon $3.90
NappiesHuggies Crawler Ultra Dry 6-11 kg 30 pack $14.98
Nintendo Wii game console $379.
Olive oil, 1 L – Bertolli Extra Virgin $13.61
Oregano, dried, 18 g – Masterfoods $4.76
Oreo cookies, 300 g $3.48
PaintDulux Designer Silk, 10 L $169.
Pain reliever, 24 pack Panadol Gel Capsules $4.02
Paper towels, 2 pack rolls – Kleenex Viva $4.89
Pasta, spaghetti – Barilla 500 g $2.73
PerfumeCalvin Klein Eternity for Women Eau de Parfum spray 100 mL $120.
Petrol (fuel), premium unleaded, 1 L $1.22
Photo, 4” x 6” print $0.29
PillowHealthGuard $20
Pizza, large – Pizza Hut Super Supreme, ordered online $7.95
Popcorn, microwave – Uncle Toby’s Butter, 3 family bag pack $4.96
PrinterHP Laserjet, 14 ppm black, 1200 dpi $137.
RazorsGillette Sensor 3 Disposable 4 pack $7.19
Refrigerator, 410 L Frost Free – Whirlpool $899.
RiceUncle Ben’s Long Grain White, 500 g $2.83
Rubbish bin bagsGlad Wave Top Tie Citrus 27 L, 72 pack $7.07
Sausages, pork, 1 kg – supermarket brand $7.86
Sheets, queen set (flat, fitted and two pillowcases), 225 thread count $59
Sneakers, men’s – Nike Air Max Tailwind + 2010 $199.99
Soap, bar – Nivea Bath Care Creme 2 pack $4.24
SpongesStay Fresh Thick 3 pack $3.80
Stereo system, compact with 3 disc changer – Jensen $179.
Subway foot-long Club sandwich $8.75
Sugar, white granulated, 1 kg – supermarket brand $1.62
Tampons, Carefree Regular 20 pack $5.19
Tea, English Breakfast, Twinings Classics 100 bag pack $9.69
Television, HD, LCD, 32” – LG $799.
Tissues, box – Kleenex, 250 pack $3.15
Toilet paperKleenex Cottonelle 8 roll pack $7.18
Tomato sauce (ketchup), 920 mL – Masterfoods $4.57
Toothpaste, 175 g tube – Colgate Regular flavour $3.59
Towel, bath, 69 x 140 cm, good quality $17.00
Undershirts, men’s, cotton, good quality, 2 pack $19.99
Vacuum cleanerDyson upright $599.
Vitamins, multi – Centrum, 100 tablets $22.99
Vodka, bottle – Absolut, 700 mL $41.99
Washing machine, front load, 1000 rpm spin – Whirlpool 7.5 kg $699.
Water, bottled – Frantelle Natural Spring 600 mL bottle 12 pack $8.27
Wine, 750 mL bottle, good quality Australian red $30.00

You can find most of the major retailers’ catalogues online at Lasoo.

If you’re looking for a product review site, try Choice, which allows you to compare products and find independent reviews.

Australian prices can be relatively high. Are you interested in moving to Australia? What other information are you missing?

Packed with helpful resources, anecdotes and advice, the Moving to Australia eBook is an excellent guide to those seeking information about migration to Australia. Whether you want to work in Australia long-term or just have a working holiday in Australia, this book will assist you with all aspects of your journey. All Australian visas are also outlined, such as skilled immigration visas, student visas and visas for those who have already found jobs in Australia.

Click here NOW to get the Moving to Australia eBook, the ultimate guide for expats in Australia..

*All prices are listed in Australian dollars (AUD). This list is intended to give you an idea of what things cost so that you can calculate a cost of living adjustment. Prices on some items can change quickly so please use this as a general guide only to determine the relative cost of living in Australia. You may find items to be significantly more expensive in regional and rural areas or in cities outside of Melbourne. The prices listed here do not reflect sale or special discount prices.
 

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Thinking about moving to Australia?

Are you interested in moving to and working in Australia? Do you want to know all about the process of relocating from someone who’s successfully done it? Are you curious about this beautiful, interesting country and its people?

Packed with helpful resources, anecdotes and advice, this eBook is an excellent guide to those seeking information about migration to Australia. Whether you want to work in Australia long-term or just have a working holiday in Australia, this book will assist you with all aspects of your journey. It will be especially helpful for those emigrating to Australia as a spouse, as the author recounts her experience from applying for the partner visa to becoming a citizen. All Australian visas are also outlined such as skilled immigration visas, student visas and visas for those who have already found jobs in Australia.

‘Moving to Australia’ covers everything from packing up your current home to finances to health cover to meeting people in Australia. It is a guide to making a successful transition to living in Australia. It’s also a great read for those who are just curious about the land Down Under or who have already arrived in Australia and need some help navigating. Whether you’re planning a permanent move to Australia or just a short-term relocation, this book will help you figure it all out.

An American expat who has lived in Australia for the last five years and is the partner of an Australian, the author has worked and studied in Australia, lived in two different states and recently became a citizen. A media and communications specialist by trade, she also has significant personal experience relocating to large cities around the world.

Click here to get it now or click “RSS entries” in the right-hand column for updates and FREE articles about emigrating to Australia and living and working in Australia.
 

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